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How a Hen Makes an Egg

How a Hen Makes an Egg

The laying cycle is an important part of a hen’s life. An egg, or ovum, starts in the ovary, high in the bird’s body, near the spine. The ovary looks like a cluster of grapes, with some ova larger than others. As the ova mature, they are released into the reproductive tract or oviduct. If there is a rooster in your flock, the egg will be fertilized soon after entering the oviduct. The various structures are added to the egg by the oviduct: egg white, chalazae (“twisters”), and membranes. The final step is the secretion of a calcium coating in...

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Help Freshly Weaned Calves Keep Their Appetite

Help Freshly Weaned Calves Keep Their Appetite

Weaning can be a stressful time for calves, but by starting on a transitional feed that is designed to get calves eating when their appetite is reduced can help their long-term performance. Research conducted by Oklahoma State University says that newly received calves can have low intake with lower requirements for protein. However, calves with severely depressed intake probably have greater protein needs. One way to mitigate any issues when transitioning calves on feed can be to have a proper transitional formula. Consider the amount of protein, energy, vitamins and trace minerals they may need. Transitional feeds are very palatable...

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Eggscellent Layers!

Eggscellent Layers!

You love getting tasty eggs from your hens, so how can you keep them healthy, happy, and laying? There are a number of factors that can influence how many eggs a hen lays in her lifetime. Breed The breed you choose is related to the number of eggs you can expect per bird. Certain breeds or hybrid strains can produce large numbers of eggs. Heritage, dual-purpose breeds, including Orpingtons, Plymouth Rocks, Australorps, and Wyandottes, are bred for both meat and eggs. They produce a good number of eggs over their lifetimes. Hybrids offer high-powered laying ability because they are crosses...

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Using Nutrition to Manage Horses with Gastric Ulcers

Using Nutrition to Manage Horses with Gastric Ulcers

A horse owner recently contacted us about changing her horse’s diet. She stated that they are ¾ of the way through show season and he is just “off his game”. It seems that the horse was showing a lack of appetite and not finishing his grain. In addition, his disposition became rather grumpy and his performance level was suffering. In addition, a few times he had shown signs of mild colic over the past two months. We suggested the owner contact her veterinarian, as it sounded like the horse may have an ulcer. The percentage of horses with ulcers continues...

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Spring Garden Hazards

Spring Garden Hazards

As spring arrives and the first buds appear, gardening can be a relaxing and healthy way to pass the time. But it can also pose some potential risks to our cat and dog friends. With care and some knowledge, these risks can be avoided. Here is a list of potential concerns. Fertilizers and Pesticides: Fertilizers containing blood meal, bone meal, feather meal or iron can be tasty for dogs and particularly dangerous. Ingestion of large amounts of meal containing products can form concretions in the stomach resulting in obstruction and severe pancreatitis. Those containing iron can lead to iron poisoning...

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